Good manners & Trick-Or-Treat!

Very important for your children to know and do before and during they trick-or-treat?

To plan for this festive day, we’re establishing some general ground rules for those on the “receiving” end.

Children stay on the walkway to the front door. You don’t want to mow down your neighbors’ prize mums.

Ring the doorbell twice, if it is not response do not insist,  go to the next home.

Be careful with the homes that are dark, should not be approached. Perhaps they are either not at home but if they do not wish to participate in Halloween you need to respect their decision can be for religious believing.

Always carry a flashlight so cars can see you and you can see where you’re walking.

And parents can add reflective tape to costumes and candy containers.

Be courteous when someone answers the door, say “Trick-or-Treat” nicely.

Be sure to say, “Thank you” after receiving your treat. Only get one candy to be respectful with the homeowner and other children. They will be more children after you looking for candies too.

Never go into someone’s home. If anyone invites to go inside be polite but decline the invitation.

Only eat candy that is wrapped. Candy unwrapped can contains something that can damage your health.

Time to start Halloween is when it becomes dark outside and not past 9:00 p.m.

Don’t rifle through the candy to find your favorite treat.  Once again take one treat unless told otherwise.

California & Arizona

Times for Trick-or-Treating

Usually, there is no set schedule for trick-or-treating in California and Arizona. Check with your city in case that it is a time scheduled this year.  Most trick-or-treaters will arrive at homes between 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., but there is no hard rule about it. Notwithstanding the fact that it is Halloween, city curfews are still enforced.

If Halloween falls on a school night, it is usually a good idea to wrap things up by 8:30 p.m. or 9 p.m. at the absolute latest.

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Thinking of buying or selling? I’m happy to help!

I am never too busy for your referrals.

Stella Bonin
Associate Broker
480.797.4884 / 619.250.6214

stella.bonin@yahoo.com

Our Team serves all Southern California and Maricopa & Pinal Counties (AZ).

California Bureau of Real Estate Lic. # 01222569
Arizona Department of Real Estate Lic. # BR550696000

“Equal Housing Opportunity”

6 Tips For Your First Home Sale

Are you ready to sell your first home? Let me help! Here are some tips for easing you into the process and making your home sale a success.

  1. Property Disclosures. As a seller, you will need to disclose all known material facts. Take special note of health and safety conditions, such as missing smoke detectors or broken windows. Additionally, paying for an inspection and completing simple repairs upfront can save you money on buyer requests for repairs or a reduction in the sales price during negotiations.

  2. Pricing your home right. Price your home appropriately for its condition and your neighborhood — I can help you find the right price through a comparative market analysis.

  3. Home showings. You’ll need to make time for buyers to view your home. Ideal home showings are flexible for a buyer’s schedule and allow them to walk through your home with their real estate agent when you are not present.

  4. Staging and decluttering. Be prepared to remove personal items and tidy up before a home viewing. Buyers want to be able to envision themselves in your home — depersonalizing and cleaning will help your home appeal to buyers.

  5. Reviewing offers. Consider all the offers you receive. Sellers have a tendency to ignore the first offer they receive from a buyer, expecting a better offer to come along. Don’t let a great offer slip by just because it’s the first offer you receive.

  6. Timing your sale. Expect your home sale to take at least three to four months to complete. This allows for proper marketing, home viewing, negotiations, and closing. Also, consider creating a timeline for when you aim to move out and complete the purchase of your next home.

Let me help make your first home sale a success. If you’re ready to begin the selling process, give me a call today!

Stella Bonin
Associate Broker
480.797.4884 / 619.250.6214

stella.bonin@yahoo.com

I am never too busy for your referrals.

Our Team serves all Southern California and Maricopa & Pinal Counties (AZ).

California Bureau of Real Estate Lic. # 01222569
Arizona Department of Real Estate Lic. # BR550696000

“Equal Housing Opportunity”

What is a Homestead?

A homestead is the dollar amount of equity you have in your home that you qualify to exempt from creditor seizure.

The dollar amount of the homestead you hold in equity in your home has priority on the title over most judgment liens and some government liens, but not your mortgages.

Two types of homestead protections are available to California homeowners:

• the declaration of homestead, which is recorded;  and

• the automatic homestead also called a statutory homestead exemption, which is not recorded.

Both homestead arrangements provide the same dollar amount of home equity protection in California.

However, you need to record a declaration of the homestead to receive all the benefits available under the homestead laws. These benefits allow you the right to sell, receive the net sales proceeds up to the dollar amount of the homestead and reinvest the funds in another home.

As a homeowner, you qualify for one of three dollar amounts of net equity homestead protection:

• a $75,000 equity as an individual homeowner with no dependents;

• a $100,000 equity as a head of household; or

• a $1750,000 equity if you are:
◦ 65 years or older;
◦ disabled; or
◦ age 55 years or older with an annual income of no more than $25,000 or a combined gross annual income of no more than $35,000 if married.

The homestead declaration needs to be signed, notarized, and recorded to take effect.

Your recorded homestead does not affect your creditworthiness.

Anyone of several individuals may sign and record the homestead declaration, including:

• you as the owner of the homestead;

• your spouse; or

• the guardian, conservator, or a person otherwise authorized to act on your or your spouse’s behalf, such as an attorney-in-fact.

Arizona’s homestead exemption laws protect up to $150,000 of a person’s equity in their dwelling from attachment, execution or forced sale. A person or married couple may only claim one homestead exemption and must reside in the dwelling for which the exemption is claimed.

33-1101. Homestead exemptions; persons entitled to hold homesteads

A. Any person the age of eighteen or over, married or single, who resides within the state may hold as a homestead exempt from attachment, execution and forced sale, not exceeding one hundred fifty thousand dollars in value, any one of the following:

1. The person’s interest in real property in one compact body upon which exists a dwelling house in which the person resides.

2. The person’s interest in one condominium or cooperative in which the person resides.

3. A mobile home in which the person resides.

4. A mobile home in which the person resides plus the land upon which that mobile home is located.

B. Only one homestead exemption may be held by a married couple or a single person under this section. The value as specified in this section refers to the equity of a single person or married couple. If a married couple lived together in a dwelling house, a condominium or cooperative, a mobile home or a mobile home plus land on which the mobile home is located and are then divorced, the total exemption allowed for that residence to either or both persons shall not exceed one hundred fifty thousand dollars in value.

C. The homestead exemption, not exceeding the value provided for in subsection A, automatically attaches to the person’s interest in identifiable cash proceeds from the voluntary or involuntary sale of the property. The homestead exemption in identifiable cash proceeds continues for eighteen months after the date of the sale of the property or until the person establishes a new homestead with the proceeds, whichever period is shorter. Only one homestead exemption at a time may be held by a person under this section.

Thinking of buying or selling? I’m happy to help!

I am never too busy for your referrals.

Stella Bonin
Associate Broker
480.797.4884 / 619.250.6214

stella.bonin@yahoo.com

Our Team serves all Southern California and Maricopa & Pinal Counties (AZ).

California Bureau of Real Estate Lic. # 01222569
Arizona Department of Real Estate Lic. # BR550696000

“Equal Housing Opportunity”

 

What is a “due-on clause”?

The due-on clause is a trust deed provision which allows your lender to call the debt due and immediately payable on any transfer of legal or equitable ownership unless prohibited by law. The primary event triggering the lender’s due-on clause and a call for immediate the payoff of the debt is the sale of the property liened by the trust deed.

The due-on clause is not only triggered by a sale using a grant deed or quitclaim deed, but by other transfers of legal or equitable ownership of real estate to a buyer, recorded or not, including:

• land sales contracts;

• lease-option agreements; and

• wraparound carryback devices also are known as all-inclusive

trust deeds (AITDs).

The due-on clause, on any type of property, is also
triggered when leasing the property to a tenant for:

• a term over three years; or

• any term length when coupled with an option to buy.

An assignment or modification of an existing lease does not trigger the due-on clause, unless:

• the term of the lease is extended beyond three years; or

• a purchase option is granted to the tenant.

On owner-occupied, one-to-four unit residential property, transfers that do not trigger due-on enforcement include:

• the creation of a junior lien where the owner continues to occupy;

• a transfer to a spouse or child who occupies;

• a transfer into an inter vivos trust when the owner continues to occupy;

• the death of a joint tenant; or

• a transfer upon the owner’s death to a relative who occupies.

Thinking of buying or selling? I’m happy to help!

I am never too busy for your referrals.

Stella Bonin
Associate Broker
480.797.4884 / 619.250.6214

stella.bonin@yahoo.com

Our Team serves all Southern California and Maricopa & Pinal Counties (AZ).

California Bureau of Real Estate Lic. # 01222569
Arizona Department of Real Estate Lic. # BR550696000

“Equal Housing Opportunity”